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Totally Off Topic... Fence Posts

Halifax Tar

Army.ca Fixture
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Has anyone ever used the expanding foam products vice quickcrete ?

Defiantly not looking forward to mixing 10 x 4 foot deep post holes worth of quickcrete... Looking to work smart not hard lol
 
My trick is…pea gravel.

I use a fence post hole digger to get the hole 3-4 feet deep.

Put a couple of scoops of pea gravel in the hole to bed the post.

Put the post in hole and square it up/rough level it. Pour a foot or so of pea gravel in the hole, all around the base. Check/adjust your level. Keep adding pea gravel a foot at a time and adjusting the post for level.

I have never had a post fall over with this method; the posts stay relatively drained/dry and if you have replace one, it is pretty simple to scoop gravel out of the hole until it releases. And you can re-use the gravel!
 
My trick is…pea gravel.

I use a fence post hole digger to get the hole 3-4 feet deep.

Put a couple of scoops of pea gravel in the hole to bed the post.

Put the post in hole and square it up/rough level it. Pour a foot or so of pea gravel in the hole, all around the base. Check/adjust your level. Keep adding pea gravel a foot at a time and adjusting the post for level.

I have never had a post fall over with this method; the posts stay relatively drained/dry and if you have replace one, it is pretty simple to scoop gravel out of the hole until it releases. And you can re-use the gravel!

Honestly I never would have thought that would hold...
 
Honestly I never would have thought that would hold...
I suppose it depends on your soil conditions. The two times I have done have been in heavy clay soils and it worked both times.

Sandy/Loamy soils- maybe not.

you could dig a test hole in your proposed fence line and test it with one post. You will know right away if it works.
 
I suppose it depends on your soil conditions. The two times I have done have been in heavy clay soils and it worked both times.

Sandy/Loamy soils- maybe not.

you could dig a test hole in your proposed fence line and test it with one post. You will know right away if it works.
This infers digging. I really don't like digging. I naturally want to dig a slit trench and have to be held back.
 
This infers digging. I really don't like digging. I naturally want to dig a slit trench and have to be held back.

My neighbor is getting some landscaping done... So I am paying the guys 500$ for 8 to 10 post holes 4ft deep...

I'm done digging... Digging and painting I hate doing...
 
My neighbor is getting some landscaping done... So I am paying the guys 500$ for 8 to 10 post holes 4ft deep...

I'm done digging... Digging and painting I hate doing...
I can never recall seeing a farmer use concrete to set a post. The pea gravel is a great idea for packing around it although we always just used the earth we took from the hole. $75 a day and a case of beer for a two man auger and the friend to hold the other side. 10 minutes a hole unless what you are digging is back fill from a construction site and then all bets are off.
 
I can never recall seeing a farmer use concrete to set a post. The pea gravel is a great idea for packing around it although we always just used the earth we took from the hole. $75 a day and a case of beer for a two man auger and the friend to hold the other side. 10 minutes a hole unless what you are digging is back fill from a construction site and then all bets are off.

Fairview is built in the side of a big hill... I have doubts they will get 4 feet. I never have, using a hydraulic auger.... I usually hit bedrock around 2.5 to 3.
 

Sika Post Fix Fast Setting Fence Post Mix - 979-ml Rona sells it, 25 bucks a bag. Depending on the number of posts, it can get costly fast.

Ontario Hydro ( or what ever they call themselves today) use a heavy duty commercial product very close to this product, bigger bags, but deeper holes and bigger poles.

Amazon sells it too
 
My trick is…pea gravel.

I use a fence post hole digger to get the hole 3-4 feet deep.

Put a couple of scoops of pea gravel in the hole to bed the post.

Put the post in hole and square it up/rough level it. Pour a foot or so of pea gravel in the hole, all around the base. Check/adjust your level. Keep adding pea gravel a foot at a time and adjusting the post for level.

I have never had a post fall over with this method; the posts stay relatively drained/dry and if you have replace one, it is pretty simple to scoop gravel out of the hole until it releases. And you can re-use the gravel!
I use a hybrid of this with gravel and quickcrete as it is cheaper than using all quickcrete but also works better in areas that are sandy/loamy as you get more holding action. The downside is you don't get to reuse that gravel.....
 
I use a hybrid of this with gravel and quickcrete as it is cheaper than using all quickcrete but also works better in areas that are sandy/loamy as you get more holding action. The downside is you don't get to reuse that gravel.....

So you just mix in bags of pea gravel with quickcrete ?
 
So you just mix in bags of pea gravel with quickcrete ?
Not sure how good mixing concrete and pea gravel would be. Aggregate in concrete needs to be rough to properly lock in and give strength. Pea gravel is too smooth. I could see layering pea gravel and concrete so that you have concrete bands/collars.

I haven't sunk any posts as deep as you but I usually use cheap gravel for the base and up the sides for drainage and then use a single bag of concrete around at the top of the hole as a collar to hold things in place.

🍻
 
Not sure how good mixing concrete and pea gravel would be. Aggregate in concrete needs to be rough to properly lock in and give strength. Pea gravel is too smooth. I could see layering pea gravel and concrete so that you have concrete bands/collars.

I haven't sunk any posts as deep as you but I usually use cheap gravel for the base and up the sides for drainage and then use a single bag of concrete around at the top of the hole as a collar to hold things in place.

🍻
Fair point, I don't use pea gravel. I use cheap gravel but essentially very similar to what you do. Most of the concrete on top but enough falls in between the gravel and just kind of locks it in well
 
Fair point, I don't use pea gravel. I use cheap gravel but essentially very similar to what you do. Most of the concrete on top but enough falls in between the gravel and just kind of locks it in well


That's a great idea... Kind of acts like a French drain eh ?
 
Has anyone ever used the expanding foam products vice quickcrete ?

Defiantly not looking forward to mixing 10 x 4 foot deep post holes worth of quickcrete... Looking to work smart not hard lol
I used to Rep the expanding foam stuff and its really not for areas with the possibility for frost. Its a midwest America development for shall we say NON Nova Scotia topography. The foam stuff does not sell well in Canada.
 
I used to Rep the expanding foam stuff and its really not for areas with the possibility for frost. Its a midwest America development for shall we say NON Nova Scotia topography. The foam stuff does not sell well in Canada.

Interesting. Thanks for letting me know. We don't generally get a deep frost. But our soil is always wet.
 
I used to Rep the expanding foam stuff and its really not for areas with the possibility for frost. Its a midwest America development for shall we say NON Nova Scotia topography. The foam stuff does not sell well in Canada.
This is like a lot of stuff sold here. Made for California but lets sell it in Canada where it gets to -40 and its made of plastic which will shatter.
 
My trick is…pea gravel.

I use a fence post hole digger to get the hole 3-4 feet deep.

Put a couple of scoops of pea gravel in the hole to bed the post.

Put the post in hole and square it up/rough level it. Pour a foot or so of pea gravel in the hole, all around the base. Check/adjust your level. Keep adding pea gravel a foot at a time and adjusting the post for level.

I have never had a post fall over with this method; the posts stay relatively drained/dry and if you have replace one, it is pretty simple to scoop gravel out of the hole until it releases. And you can re-use the gravel!
The only thing I would add is this can require a lot of gravel fill. I do something similar, but use the concrete forms (the oversized cardboard toilet rolls) with the post in it with gravel fill, then fill in around it with whatever soil/clay came out of the hole.

Unless you are digging it by hand, which is a massive amount of work. I''ve done that before as well and it sucked when I was in my 20s, let alone in my 40s. Usually the augers on the tractors etc are oversized specifically so you can locate the concrete form properly then backfill around it before setting the post and pouring concrete. But even then used to have some gravel in the bottom to get the post roughly level before the pour, and make sure there is drainage at the bottom.
 
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