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Tim Hortons in Theatre Merged Thread (in AFG, no plans to preposition)

wow. Didn't know that wendy's was giving up Tim's and that Tim's was actually going to scoop up shares. What's going to happen to all those joint Wendy's/Tim Horton's stores when all is done?
 
The simple explanation is that Wendy's, having looked at the future marketability of the TH chain found that it had reached it's saturation point in Canada.  Some analysts argue that when that occurs the profits remain static with not much growth factors (more profit).  Wendy's has decided to offload it's shares in TH to free up cash flow to pursue other cash cows.

(Doesn't anyone see the irony of the whinning about TH not being patriotic when it's owned by an American corp?)
 
niner domestic said:
It's not a rumour, Wendy's made that announcement back in June to target the remaining shares for sale in the Fall.  The speculation is that Tim Horton's will attempt to purchase the outstanding stock. 

They have earmarked $200 million for a stock buy back
 
niner domestic said:
The simple explanation is that Wendy's, having looked at the future marketability of the TH chain found that it had reached it's saturation point in Canada.  Some analysts argue that when that occurs the profits remain static with not much growth factors (more profit).  Wendy's has decided to offload it's shares in TH to free up cash flow to pursue other cash cows.

(Doesn't anyone see the irony of the whinning about TH not being patriotic when it's owned by an American corp?)

One of the other things that prompted Wendy's to sell off TH is that, in some ways, they found that TH was diluting their share of the market - taking away sales (from itself)..... twisted thinking IMHO but, they're the ones with the big staff.

WRT TH "raking in the big bucks" from all that free advertising, I would say "bull hockey",  The Chain & the franchisees have made no effort to air the fact that there is a TH franchise in KAF... TH could ask us to take down the TH shingle in KAF & we'd (CF) just be buying their supplies @ cost BUT, for the boys over there, it wouldn't be Timmy's (would it)
 
This Just IN....


It's not Tim Horton's fault Kandahar coffee costs so much

Mon Nov 27 2006

NIAGARA FALLS, Ont. -- Company and military officials say Canadian taxpayers won't be footing a reported $4-million bill for Canadian troops to enjoy a cup of Tim Hortons coffee in Afghanistan.

Media reports had pegged the price tag for starting up the coffee franchise in the Kandahar region at $4 million, with maintenance costing up to $5 million each year.

Officials at Tim Hortons head office in Oakville, Ont., and the Department of National Defence in Ottawa said the amount reported late last month was wrong.

The numbers were taken from a report that contained estimated costs for the project and not actual costs, they said.

"It has been very confusing, because it was incorrectly reported," said Nick Javor, senior vice-president of corporate affairs for Tim Hortons.

Karen Johnstone, spokeswoman for National Defence in Ottawa, said the incremental cost for the first 12 months was an estimated $1.16 million. That included $200,000 to hook up the trailers and $80,000 per month for employee wages and utilities.

Moreover, the Afghanistan venture is not a normal business transaction, Javor said.

Rather than Tim Hortons contacting the military about opening an outlet in Kandahar, it was the soldiers who made it known to their superiors they would like to have a Tim Hortons outlet.

Tim Hortons waived the $450,000 franchise fee, future royalty fees, sold the two sales trailers to the Canadian military at cost and supplied technical staff, volunteers and others to help with training.

The Tim Hortons outlet in Kandahar, run by the Canadian Forces Personnel Support Agency, serves 2,300 Canadian troops and 5,000 personnel from other countries. It is located on a boardwalk along with other American concessions. Their gross profit is $5,000 a day.

-- CanWest News Service

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/subscriber/canada/story/3791527p-4385276c.html

:salute:
 
numbers, numbers.... all sorts of numbers.

When you get down to it TH is there for troop morale.  It should not be making a profit.  This stuff is "in lieu" of the two beer limit we were used to having when deployed to such places as the FRY...............

Who cares what it costs? - this is a quality of life issue and money should not be an issue~!

IMHO!
 
And seeing as the profit goes to back to PSP, and gets re-routed to the troops thru the MFRC?
Do the troops mind if they're paying and extra penny or two for something that reminds them of home?

Troops, your input please.
GP
 
If the troops objected, do you think they would be pumping their cash across the TH counter?....

They support it!
 
http://www.niagarafallsreview.ca/webapp/sitepages/content.asp?contentID=290188&catname=Local+News

Kandahar Tim's not costing us; Taxpayers not subsidizing coffee outlet for soldiers in Afghanistan: Company

TONY RICCIUTO
Local News - Saturday, November 25, 2006 @ 02:00

Taxpayers aren't getting creamed after all for the cost to open a Tim Hortons outlet in Afghanistan, where Canadian soldiers are serving.

Canadians will not be stuck paying millions of dollars a year for troops to enjoy a cup of Tim Hortons coffee while serving in Afghanistan.

A recent news report stated it cost Canadian taxpayers close to $4 million to set up a Tim Hortons outlet in the Kandahar region of Afghanistan. The report added it will continue to cost about $5 million each year.

In interviews, however, officials at Tim Hortons head office in Oakville and the Department of National Defence in Ottawa say the report was wrong. They said startup costs and future expenses should be covered by profits earned by the Afghanistan outlet.

"It has been very confusing, because it was incorrectly reported," said Nick Javor, senior vice-president of corporate affairs for Tim Hortons.

The news item that originated with CanWest News Service, he added, also aired on Global National TV.

The Afghanistan venture was not a normal business transaction, Javor said.
Rather than Tim Hortons contacting the military about opening an outlet in Kandahar, it was the soldiers who made it known to their superiors they would like to have a Tim Hortons outlet.

"They wanted a taste of home, they were homesick. It was a morale builder, because at the end of the day they want to have their Timmy," said Javor.

A high-ranking general contacted the president of Tim Hortons to see if it was possible. Key people from the company were called in to make it happen.

Javor said in the past, the company has been supportive of the men and women who serve in the armed forces. Every Christmas, cans of coffee are shipped wherever Canadian soldiers are serving. Over the past five years, Tim Hortons has sent more than 30,000 cans of coffee, usually with little or no publicity.

In this case, Tim Hortons waived the $450,000 franchise fee, future royalty fees, sold the two sales trailers to the Canadian military at cost and supplied technical staff, volunteers and others to help with training.

Javor said financial figures mentioned in news reports were incorrect, because they were taken from a report that contained estimated costs for the project - not actual costs.

For example, CanWest reported the total cost for the first year of operations at Tim Hortons' Kandahar franchise was more than $3.9 million.

Karen Johnstone, spokeswoman for National Defence in Ottawa, said the incremental cost for the first 12 months was an estimated $1.16 million. That included $200,000 to hook up the trailers and $80,000 per month for employee wages and utilities.

"The costs reported by Global National are incorrect," said Johnstone. "Those costs came from an initial estimate that differ from the actual costs."

The Tim Hortons outlet in Kandahar, run by the Canadian Forces Personnel Support Agency, serves 2,300 Canadian troops and 5,000 personnel from other countries. It is located on a boardwalk along with several American concessions. Their gross profit is $5,000 a day.

As with any business, said Javor, there are startup costs, but those will be repaid from the profit that is generated.

Johnstone said net profits will be used for a number of things, including paying back the cost of the unit and investing in morale and welfare programs for soldiers and their families.

"It was never intended by either side for it to be a commercial venture," said Johnstone.

Tom Newell, who owns the Tim Hortons outlets in Chippawa and on McLeod Road, said there's a Niagara Falls connection to this story. "The trailer we had here when he had the renovation done on McLeod Road is one of the trailers that was sent over to Afghanistan."

Newell felt the initial coverage made Tim Hortons look like it was "very greedy and profiting off our boys in Afghanistan, and it was really quite the opposite.

"They had requested it because they were missing a taste of home."

The trailer that's in Afghanistan now was at McLeod Road for about six weeks while renovations were underway.

"The renovation was done in February and the trailer sat in the cold ice and snow, and now it's sitting in the heat and sand," Newell said.

tricciuto@nfreview.com
 
At  $5,000 a day thats almost 2 million a year. How does that compae to other tim hortons  Canada side?

On a side note Americans are hooked to the stuff.  $5000 a day? I bet thats on a bad day.  Not uncommon for people to order 50 coffees at once.  An american girl ordered 106 coffees one time, sadly she was infront of me.

I never noticed the prices were high, then again I'm not a coffee drinker.  If it's too expensive then get it for free in the kitchen .
 
Flawed Design said:
An american girl ordered 106 coffees one time, sadly she was infront of me.

The US Army must also use the f%king Timmies in Byron as well, [near London, ON].  :threat: :crybaby:
 
whiskey601 said:
The US Army must also use the f%king Timmies in Byron as well, [near London, ON].  :threat: :crybaby:
Nah, that's just the way Byron is.  You should try the one in Forest, Ontario on a Sat morn
 
rmacqueen said:
Nah, that's just the way Byron is.  You should try the one in Forest, Ontario on a Sat morn
Or any of the Tims in Gagetown between 1000-1030 any day of the week. Oy yoy yoy.  :mad:
 
I remember they had to put in rules at the Valcatraz TH
- No LAVs or 2 1/2s at the drive thru window
- No groups in excess of 30 allowed in at one time
- No weapons inside the store
 
The TH at Young and Robie in Hellifax brags to be the busiest TH in Canada.  (not sure if they just meant in the AM only or at stand easy)
 
Tim Horton's coffee is disgusting...But then again Starbucks doesn't have any plans to go to A-Stan....Yes lets fill up our troops with shitty coffee and fatty disgusting donuts...How about a bar on base that serves more than 3 times a year...
 
tannerthehammer said:
How about a bar on base that serves more than 3 times a year...

And that has ....what....to do with TH is Afghanistan ?
 
tannerthehammer said:
Tim Horton's coffee is disgusting

BLASPHEME!!!  ;D

If were going to make a list of the busiest TH in Canada, I'd like to see which one is the worst.
In my books, the TH at the Wolf Island ferry terminal in Kingston, Ont is by far the worst Timmies.
There could be 3 people in line with small orders (like 2-4 coffees) yet you'll still be waiting +10 minutes in line.
It's dirty and there is a needle drop box in the male washroom.
Ironically, the store is strategically placed right across from the Kingston Police station... (insert typical cop stereotype here).
 
Hi there,
Just wanted to know if anyone had info regarding gift certificates purchased in Canada whether or not they are valid at the Tim's on the base in AFGHANISTAN?
Thanks! DS :salute:
 
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