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The Royal Navy reintroduced black hats for submariners 6 months ago. This is the first time black hat covers have been worn for over 50 years.

dimsum

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Maybe the awesome leather jacket is supposed to be a protective outer layer? Combined with the mirror shades and you will be too cool for any flame to touch, and on your way to the beach volleyball court in no time!

Get this - the RCAF leather jacket isn't approved for flying.

jimmy fallon laughing GIF by Obama
 

stoker dave

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FSTO said:
CPO1 Parent recommended the reflective tape for our NCD's and was shot down. For the reason of it not then being suitable for walking out dress.

Sorry to belabour this point but requirements for safety clothing should not be decided by a show of hands, a vote or someone's opinion. Safety clothing is based on a rigorous and documented assessment of hazards and how to mitigate those hazards to assure the safety of workers.

Yeah, I am happy to be retired and working for a company where worker clothing requirements are determined by experts in health and safety and industrial hygiene. I will add that failure to wear (or failure to properly wear) required safety clothing can be a basis for termination of employment.

That's the end of my rant. Apologies for the drift.
 

Good2Golf

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Also, the 2-piece RCAF flight suit needs a belt because the shirt is tucked in.

They have never issued or authorized any other belt other than the green (now brown) nylon cargo strap. On an FR uniform.
“Not authorized?”

Not sure about that, dimsum, or perhaps some communities inside the AF? My belt(s) have been locally made by the ALSE shop using FR belting. 🤷🏻‍♂️ It’s an LPO item, not nationally stocked.
 

FSTO

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Sorry to belabour this point but requirements for safety clothing should not be decided by a show of hands, a vote or someone's opinion. Safety clothing is based on a rigorous and documented assessment of hazards and how to mitigate those hazards to assure the safety of workers.

Yeah, I am happy to be retired and working for a company where worker clothing requirements are determined by experts in health and safety and industrial hygiene. I will add that failure to wear (or failure to properly wear) required safety clothing can be a basis for termination of employment.

That's the end of my rant. Apologies for the drift.
Maybe this is not a popular opinion but this whole shipboard wear vs walking out dress is reflective of the trend towards more casual wearing of clothes these days. Or to be more blunt, people are bloody lazy and if they could, they'd be in pajamas all day. So here we are, folks want to wake up at home, get in their NCD's and never have to change until they get home at the end of the day. So to support that ideal, we've made a compromise between utility and safety and looking somewhat like a professional military. Like most compromises we've failed spectacularly.

Shipboard uni's should be practical, fire retardant and reflective so you can be seen if overboard or a casualty. It should not be something worn ashore in an office environment. That dress should be comfortable and portray a competent professional military. Minimal bling (name, rank, ribbons and qualification indicators).
There is nothing wrong with having ceremonial dress that portrays the environment that we serve in (yes horror of horrors, square rig for the sailors! 6 button jackets for PO2 and above and 8 button for the officers) when on parade or other ceremonies. I know that there are a lot of holes in my argument, but what the heck, this is what this site is for! LOL!
 

stoker dave

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Let's do man overboard drills at night: Killicks with reflective clothing, and Admirals without.
Yup.

Casualties in the engine room during electrical blackout. Those with high-vis clothing are spotted, recovered and get medical treatment first.
 

daftandbarmy

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Yup.

Casualties in the engine room during electrical blackout. Those with high-vis clothing are spotted, recovered and get medical treatment first.

Every millwright wears reflective tape on their gear for similar reasons, and it has saved lives.

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