• Thanks for stopping by. Logging in to a registered account will remove all generic ads. Please reach out with any questions or concerns.

How to Show Compassion Without Compromising on Performance

daftandbarmy

Army.ca Relic
Reaction score
14,963
Points
1,160
What? No yelling? Must be a passing fad ;)

How to Show Compassion Without Compromising on Performance​

There is a growing demand for more compassionate leadership, and not just because the Covid-19 pandemic has exacerbated the stresses of living and working in the modern world. People now look for jobs that will give them a sense of purpose and belonging, and expect to be treated with consideration and respect at work. They want leaders who listen and care about them, and who see them as humans and not just as workhorses.

While some executives have heard the message, they may feel a tug-of-war between the call from the ground to show compassion and the pressure from the top to deliver results. They may also have to contend with colleagues and bosses who remain cynical about the argument that compassion is a path to effectiveness and profitability.

Even if leaders believe a healthy and happy workforce can fuel corporate success, they may still short-change workers, particularly in the face of short-term targets. They would be short-sighted to do so.

Results need not be sacrificed to foster a caring workplace. Far from it being a sign of ineffective leadership or a drain on resources, investing in employee welfare pays off in the long run. When workers feel valued, they are more engaged and perform better, leading to measurable corporate outcomes such as improved productivity, competitiveness and profitability. Additionally, reduced burnout and turnover rates benefit the bottom line.

In its latest State of the Global Workplace report , global analytics and consulting firm Gallup notes that business units with engaged workers have 23 percent higher profits, lower absenteeism, turnover and accidents, as well as higher customer loyalty.

The conclusion: It makes good business sense to promote well-being at work.


 

Brad Sallows

Army.ca Fixture
Reaction score
4,155
Points
1,010
I'm sorry, but if your performance doesn't improve, we will be compelled to let you go.
 

rmc_wannabe

Army.ca Veteran
Subscriber
Reaction score
2,867
Points
1,310
So long as it's genuine compassion.

The "How's your mental health? Not good? Oh... well next time, just say good and STFU." mentality I have seen during the pandemic is worse than apathy to be honest.
 

Brad Sallows

Army.ca Fixture
Reaction score
4,155
Points
1,010
There was a time when if staff performance was low, they let the Boss go

One vs many. One - it's him. Many - it's the boss (or some common factor higher than the coal face).
 

mariomike

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Mentor
Reaction score
860
Points
1,260
Only thing they monitored ( during my time ) was chute time.

Want compassion? Go see the dept. Chaplain or staff psychologist.
 

Furniture

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
1,942
Points
1,110
Only thing they monitored ( during my time ) was chute time.

Want compassion? Go see the dept. Chaplain or staff psychologist.
I suspect that the job market conditions were significantly different then...

I'm guessing Toronto EMS hired direct off the street, and provided training. I'm also guessing that they had near 100 names on a waiting list for every person in uniform. People put up with a lot of crap from their bosses when they know they are immediately replaceable if they cause a fuss.
 

mariomike

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Mentor
Reaction score
860
Points
1,260
I suspect that the job market conditions were significantly different then...

I'm guessing Toronto EMS hired direct off the street, and provided training. I'm also guessing that they had near 100 names on a waiting list for every person in uniform. People put up with a lot of crap from their bosses when they know they are immediately replaceable if they cause a fuss.
As I said, you could pour your heart out to the dept. Chaplain or staff psychologist, if you feel the need. Thats what they were paid for.

But, they can't change what is out there. The boss can't either.

I was hired "off the street", at the end of the summer I graduated high school. They still had the Residency Requirement back then.

By 1975, all apllicants were mandated to have the one-year ( now two ) Humber or Centenial community college cert.

As far as stress goes, nothing new about that, but the policy has changed since I retired. They have Stress Leave now.

And, If it needs to be permanent, members are placed in a "suitable" job classification, in another city dept.

This is the important financial part,

If the pre-injury rate of pay is higher than the relocated position rate, then the pre-injury rate is to be maintained. It is understood that the pre-injury rate is subject to all wage increases negotiated.

Want to show your crew some compassion ? Let them sleep rest between the tones going off.

And for efficiency experts,

Power napping has been shown to boost productivity, energy, and performance​

 

Eaglelord17

Sr. Member
Reaction score
605
Points
840
It costs nothing for management to pretend to care, ask people how its going, and periodically say good job. Listening to workers can also uncover issues you didn't even realize exists and potentially solve them to speed up work/become more efficient.

When employees don't trust management to look out for anything beyond themselves, they don't work with them. My current workplace is like this, the workforce is demoralized, untrusting, and generally everyone is there simply for the paycheque and then goes home without any extra effort. Why? Because management continually screws with people, and doesn't give any sort of thanks even when people work hard for them. If anything it causes people to slow down and be no where near as productive as they could be. It is even worse when there is clear favoritism/cronyism where a double standard is clearly in effect.

If you want people to work hard for you, beating them into the ground isn't the solution. Making them feel appreciated and wanting to be there is.
 

Halifax Tar

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
3,522
Points
1,260
Only thing they monitored ( during my time ) was chute time.

Want compassion? Go see the dept. Chaplain or staff psychologist.

The Office Boomer GIF by MOODMAN
 

mariomike

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Mentor
Reaction score
860
Points
1,260
"boomer"? ooh, your memes! :ROFLMAO:

Like I said, they ( the dept. Chaplain or staff psychologist. ) can't change what's out there.

If you feel the need, you can ask your boss for a hug, but s/he can't change what's out there either.


Want to show your crew compassion? Spare them the pep talks, and let them enjoy some rest and relaxation between the tones going off.

In that respect, our boss was compassionate.

That "compassion" increased "performance".

"Power napping" has been shown to boost productivity, energy, and performance.

 
Top