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Drone Delivery Canada awarded first contract for Canary drone from Department of National Defence

Blackadder1916

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DDC AWARDED FIRST CONTRACT FOR ITS CANARY DRONE FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE​

September 7, 2023

TORONTO, ONTARIO – September 7, 2023 – Drone Delivery Canada Corp. (TSXV: FLT; OTC QX: TAKOF; Frankfurt: A3DP5Y or ABBA.F) (the “Company” or “DDC”) is pleased to announce that on August 29, 2023, it had signed a contract (the “Contract”) with the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces’ (DND/CAF) Innovation for Defence Excellence and Security (IDEaS) program to operate and evaluate DDC’s proprietary drone delivery platform using DDC’s recently commercialized Canary remote piloted aircraft (“RPA”).
The Contract, with a value of $200,000, will run for a 6-month duration. A successful outcome of this initial contract could lead to a follow on 12-month contract valued up to $1 million.
Under the terms of the Contract, the Canary will be operated and evaluated in a test environment setting as well as a real-world operation to demonstrate the Canary’s ability to deliver just in time medical equipment and supplies in austere environments.
As part of the IDEaS program, DDC’s Canary drone has been selected to potentially play a crucial role in supporting the DND/CAF’s delivery of medical equipment and other necessary supplies during mission-critical operations.
The Canary, a state-of-the-art unmanned aircraft system, is equipped with cutting-edge technology and capabilities, making it an ideal choice for the DND/CAF. With its advanced payload capacity, long-range capabilities, and ability to operate in diverse weather conditions, the Canary offers great versatility for various defence logistics applications.
Through this partnership, DDC and the DND/CAF could potentially have an impact on the logistics within the defence sector. The integration of drone delivery solutions will enhance the efficiency, speed, and safety during critical operations by reducing the reliance on traditional transportation methods. The Canary’s ability to transport essential medical aid to remote, inaccessible, and higher risk locations will significantly benefit the CAF.
“We are proud to have been selected by the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces for the IDEaS program,” said Steve Magirias, CEO of Drone Delivery Canada. “This selection is a testament to our innovative technology and its potential to have a positive impact on the defence sector. We are confident that the Canary drone can play a vital role in advancing the DND/CAF’s mission-critical operations, providing them with enhanced logistical capabilities and a competitive advantage.”
The collaboration between DDC and the DND/CAF showcases Canada’s commitment to embracing cutting-edge technology for the betterment of national defence. By harnessing the power of drone delivery solutions, the DND/CAF will be able to efficiently address challenges related to logistics, remote operations, and emergency response, ensuring the safety and security of Canada, its citizens, and members of the DND/CAF.

Yes, typical press release hyperbole. The point that caught my attention was:

"Under the terms of the Contract, the Canary will be operated and evaluated in a test environment setting as well as a real-world operation to demonstrate the Canary’s ability to deliver just in time medical equipment and supplies in austere environments."

And a view of the vehicle involved Get the Latest Drone Technology from Drone Delivery Canada


Canary UAS.jpg
 
I absolutely despise all the LOE and funding that goes into these innovations when we are concurrently cutting ongoing support for existing operational and safety capabilities while leaving positions empty.

Especially when this horseshit does the sexy upfront 5%, then throws the 95% of actual work and maintenance over the fence to people already underfunded/resourced. If they are going to multi task, at least do it end to end for your stupid AR glasses and other random ideas, and leave us alone to try and keep things like parts in the bins and the actual equipment they want the AR glasses to help with maintenance of actually working. Some dumbass google glasses just makes you look stupid when you are looking at broken equipment with no spares and a multi-year EDD. Virtual lipstick on the proverbial dead horse.

argh... /rant over, bring on the weekend.
 
^^
to make you feel good about your station in life, its not much better to the south of us.

Thanks for the share, it linked to another related article that was also really good;

The Navy Gets the New York Times Treatment

This bit really struck a cord, and from what I can tell, ours is actually more bureaucratic with more approval gates and oversight, with even less people per capita to do the work.
[..]
Indeed, the procurement system is a barrier to transformation. More importantly, the procurement system is a barrier to simply providing, sustaining, and maintaining the Navy we have. This is the “inefficiency” cited elsewhere. The kluge of statutory requirements that make-up our procurement system stands as a monument to previous mistakes and overcorrections. Would that the New York Times loosed an ace reporter on a deep treatment of this house of horrors.

I was talking to someone from the USN a few months ago about some projects, and he said something along the lines that he wishes they could have the same agility we do (ie small teams). It was funny, because I was thinking I wish we had a bigger fraction of the kind of resources they do as they have entire teams doing things that are a single item on a pile that we are doing. Probably a happy middle ground somewhere.
 
I was talking to someone from the USN a few months ago about some projects, and he said something along the lines that he wishes they could have the same agility we do (ie small teams). It was funny, because I was thinking I wish we had a bigger fraction of the kind of resources they do as they have entire teams doing things that are a single item on a pile that we are doing. Probably a happy middle ground somewhere.
I’ve heard similar with the USAF.

The US military, in general, is ridiculously bureaurcratic. A Canadian friend had mentioned before that “money covers up inefficiency”.
 
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