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Communications and Electronics Engineering ( CELE )

chrisf

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Darth_Hamel said:
Being an officer is totally different from being an NCM. If you like getting dirty and working with your hands then I suggest NEVER going officer. You are trained on how to use radio equipment, but only to understand its capabilities and to use in the event of an emergency. As an officer you deal with paperwork, and conceptual things like exercise planning.

But as an officer, don't forget how to do the dirty work... when it comes down to crunch time, no time for idle hands.

Seen a few officers decide they were above physical labour. If you've got paperwork to do or orders to write or recce to do or whatever, fine. But if you've got time to read a news paper while your troops (Or even somone elses troops) are doing a set-up or tear down, you've got a problem, grab somthing and get to work, your troops will have more respect for you and in turn work harder for you.

What this means is that to get into the field as an officer you have to make time for it, which can be difficult but is never impossible.

Nonsense. If your troops are in the field, you're in the field. Plain and simple.

A good troop commander should be in the field every time their troops are. Whether this happens depends upon how gung ho or lazy the officer is, and how much administrative support there is at the unit.

See above. If you've got administrative problems, you sort them out.

And while we're on the subject of you, did that scratch ever heal up after?
 

Canadian Sig

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Just a Sig Op said:
Nonsense. If your troops are in the field, you're in the field. Plain and simple.

Fraid thats not always true at 2 Sigs. We spend lots of time in the field without our troop officers.
 

chrisf

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Canadian Sig said:
Fraid thats not always true at 2 Sigs. We spend lots of time in the field without our troop officers.

Whether it happens or not doesn't mean it should happen. If you're in the field, your officers should be in the field. Hard to lead from the rear.
 

Canadian Sig

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Just a Sig Op said:
Whether it happens or not doesn't mean it should happen. If you're in the field, your officers should be in the field. Hard to lead from the rear.

Yah. Then its called pushing, not leading..lol
 

Radop

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All due respect to Officers et al BUT, I would rather they not be there until we call them forward.

Darth, sounds like you may have a deligation issue!  Task your people with some of that stuff.  Tp WO and Sgts can create and run an exercise, course, etc for you.  You don't need to micro manage them, just remember that.

Cnd Sig, you remember that CP Op crse the unit ran in '04.  B Tp WO and Tp Comd came out only on the last day, the verification day!
 

MC

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good advice in this thread... I'll keep it mind. keep it coming, old timers  :)
 

PaulD

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After almost a year of trying to get in Reg. Force as a DEO, I've taken my CFRC recruiters advice
and looked at local reserve units who are looking for people.  I've now signed up with a local
Commications Regiment to become a Signals Field Officer.  I'm now just waiting for Group to
approve my application and hopefully I can take the last slot for summer BOTC.  Looking forward
to working with you fine folks. 
 

lugarou

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If you got in then I'll be there too. I'm not sure if you can call me a fine folk though.....
 

boehm

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After almost a year of trying to get in Reg. Force as a DEO, I've taken my CFRC recruiters advice
and looked at local reserve units who are looking for people.  I've now signed up with a local
Commications Regiment to become a Signals Field Officer.  I'm now just waiting for Group to
approve my application and hopefully I can take the last slot for summer BOTC.  Looking forward
to working with you fine folks.

That wouldn't happen to be 744 Communication Regiment, would it?
 

Sig_Des

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Yeah...you're right...it's just my initial reaction whenever I hear 744.

Hey you guys get your granola bars and hemp Tac Vests issued to you yet? I heard all the West Coast Comms units are getting them now!  ;D
 

boehm

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Oh man I love the new hemp Tac Vest! The mag pouches are smaller so they fit my granola bars perfectly and the non-fat soy latte holder is so usefull, way better then the stupid canteen holder we had on the old webbing. Although I must say, my favorite feature is the sternum mounted flower holder. ;D
 

Pinto

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Just to add my $0.02 to the discussion.

Full Disclosure: I am a Signal Officer with 21 years experience in the Army. But, as with any forum post, the following are my personal opinions; take them for what you will.

   -what status/image do Sig Officers have in the army? Are they labelled as paper pushers by Navy/Air?

Generally, I find that all classifications realize that we are all part of a team, all doing our bit to help out. Sure, there is a fair amount of friendly rivalry; (I tend to refer to Naval officers as "Squids," but that might just be me). Within the Army, I have found that there is definitely a "combat arms" club, in that it is generally expected that the Combat Arms officers (Infantry, Artillery, Armoured and Engineers (sorta)) are the ones who run the army, and other officer classifications (Signals, Log, EME, etc) are almost 2nd class citizens. This is very strongly enforced on some of the senior officer courses. But, again, in general, we all get along and respect each other's skills and talents. Just as much as we deride those who can't do the job they are supposed to do.

   -can I expect to participate in combat?

There are Signal Officers in Afghanistan today, participating in the operations there. Technically, they are not "in combat," as in, they are not in a trench with a rifle firing at advancing enemy troops. But all officers and all soldiers are trained to do so, if necessary. The enemy doesn't distinguish combat arms officers from combat support officers.

   -do Sig Officers get weapons practice after they finish their training?

Annual weapons refreshers, if you are lucky enough to be in a unit that can afford ammunition. I was often tasked as Range Safety Officer (RSO) for my unit. You don't tend to get to shoot much when you are in NDHQ, but it does occasionally happen.

   -I am a bit crazy about crypto and computer security. Should I expect to see that as part of my day-to-day activities?

Not necessarily Day to Day, unless you are assigned to such a job. COMSEC Custodian is a common secondary duty for junior officers (I've done it a few times myself), and there are many Signal Officers who work with crypto and comp sec daily.

Hope this helps!

Cheers!
 

PaulD

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Change of plans.  I got selected for Reg. Force this last selection board.  I'm off to St. Jean Sept. 4.  Give my regards to Cpl. N and MCpl. K.  at 744 Communications Reg.
 

SpitfireXVI

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Hello,

I've recently contacted a recruiting center about signing up for CELE Officer. It sounds like they have a fairly technical job so I'm wondering if it's challenging intellectually. They have said there something like 24 positions open and with that trade they can give you an offer right at the recruiting office. I am just finishing up my Comp Sci degree in 7 months and have really good references from my work term employers (who would hire me if I wanted to go the civy route). I used to be a Signal Operator in the reserves and I've decided I really miss the whole army thing. I have a 70 average right now, but the last two years of my university I have had an 80-84 average.

1) I'm assuming CELE officers would get to go overseas as (Kandahar air force base).
2) How long does it take to complete your CELE Officer Training (I have no french experience).
3) From this forum it seems like CELE is very competitive, what do you think my chances are?
4) It sounds like Sig O is less technical than CELE from this forum is that true?
 

SpitfireXVI

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Also another question I have is do you eventually have to do a polygraph?

I have nothing to hide, but during my undergrad I did a report on polygraphs and used a lot of information from this site:

http://antipolygraph.org/

So I'm worried I'll be very nervous because I don't believe polygraphs really work and that they have a lot of false positives. Also they probably ask if you ever researched counter measures, which I have for the report I wrote for a class I took.
 

DVessey

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SpitfireXVI said:
Hello,

I've recently contacted a recruiting center about signing up for CELE Officer. It sounds like they have a fairly technical job so I'm wondering if it's challenging intellectually. They have said there something like 24 positions open and with that trade they can give you an offer right at the recruiting office. I am just finishing up my Comp Sci degree in 7 months and have really good references from my work term employers (who would hire me if I wanted to go the civy route). I used to be a Signal Operator in the reserves and I've decided I really miss the whole army thing. I have a 70 average right now, but the last two years of my university I have had an 80-84 average.

1) I'm assuming CELE officers would get to go overseas as (Kandahar air force base).
2) How long does it take to complete your CELE Officer Training (I have no french experience).
3) From this forum it seems like CELE is very competitive, what do you think my chances are?
4) It sounds like Sig O is less technical than CELE from this forum is that true?

Disclaimer: Not a fully qualified CELE O here, but I've  done a few summers worth of OJT(CFS Alert, Greenwood, and this summer at CFNOC).

Just to make sure we're clear, by CELE, I'm referring to the CELE(air) occupation. There used to be a CELE(land), but now there's just Signals on the Army side.
The simplest way to describe the typical job of a CELE is that they are responsible for everything electronic on an air base except for what's on the air planes themselves. That includes radar, radio, computers, networks, phones, etc.

1. KAF = Kandahar Air Field, not exactly an air force base. The most common CELE deployments will be in support of communications, which may or may not include an air base.
2. Right now, the CELE course runs for 89 training days, and they run two serials per year. I'm not sure about the French training - I know they used to take you right out of basic and stick you on French for a few months, but I believe that's all changed now. Starting next year, CELE's will also be doing Common Army Phase (last I heard anyway).
3. Work hard, do some more research. Remember that CELE is an officer occupation, it may be technical but you'll rarely (depends...) get your hands dirty.
4. Of course it is ;) Just kidding. Sigs and CELEs work together on a lot of things, our roles overlap in a few areas. As for who's more technical, can't really say.

As for the polygraph thing, I have yet to take one...
 

PuckChaser

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SpitfireXVI said:
Also another question I have is do you eventually have to do a polygraph?

I have nothing to hide, but during my undergrad I did a report on polygraphs and used a lot of information from this site:

http://antipolygraph.org/

So I'm worried I'll be very nervous because I don't believe polygraphs really work and that they have a lot of false positives. Also they probably ask if you ever researched counter measures, which I have for the report I wrote for a class I took.

I've gone through a lot of screening to get my clearances, and never once did a polygraph. If they need information about you, its easier to ask around or investigate than to worry about false positives on a polygraph.
 
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