Author Topic: School Girls Have Acid Thrown On Them- Do Some Still Doubt Why We Are There?  (Read 31056 times)

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Offline twistedcables

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Afghan teacher wants acid thrown on her attackers
« Reply #50 on: November 25, 2008, 19:58:10 »
Punishment fits the crime?


http://ca.news.yahoo.com/s/capress/081125/world/afghanistan

By Noor Khan And Jason Straziuso, The Associated Press

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan - A 23-year-old teacher, burned in an acid attack on 15 schoolgirls and instructors, wants the Afghan government to throw acid on her attackers and then hang them.

Kandahar's governor said Tuesday authorities had arrested 10 alleged Taliban militants for the Nov. 12 attack in the southern city and several confessed to taking part.

Gov. Rahmatullah Raufi said the men would be tried in open court, a pledge that pleased Nuskaal, a first-year math teacher who suffered acid burns on her shoulders.

"Those girls were simply going to school to get an education," said Nuskaal, who like many Afghans goes by one name.

"My parents told me that security isn't good enough and that they were worried about me teaching. But I told my parents I won't stop teaching."

"I'm not afraid."

After the attack, President Hamid Karzai called for the perpetrators to be executed in public. Nuskaal said the attackers should have acid thrown on them first.

Men riding motorbikes squirted acid from water bottles onto three groups of students and teachers walking to school. Several girls suffered burned faces and were taken to hospital. One teenager couldn't open her eyes for days after the attack, which sparked condemnation around the world.

Afghanistan's government called the attack "un-Islamic," while the United Nations labelled it "a hideous crime."

The government charged Tuesday that high-ranking Taliban fighters paid the suspects a total of $2,000 to carry out the attack. The assailants came from Pakistan but were Afghan nationals, said Doud Doud, an Interior Ministry official.

Taliban spokesman Qari Yousef Ahmadi denied Tuesday that any of the group's members were involved.

Kandahar province is the spiritual birthplace of the Taliban Islamic militiamen who ruled Afghanistan from 1996 to 2001 and are now waging an insurgency against Karzai. The area is one of Afghanistan's most conservative, a place where women rarely venture far from home.

Islamic extremists have attacked many schools to discourage girls from getting an education. Raufi, the governor, said students at the Mirwais Mena girls school didn't return to class for three days after the acid attack.

Girls were banned from schools under Taliban rule and women could leave their homes only if they were clad in a body-hiding burqa and accompanied by a male relative.

Afghanistan has made a major push to improve access to education for girls since a U.S.-led offensive ousted the Taliban following the Sept. 11, 2001 terror attack on the United States.

Fewer than one million Afghan children - mostly boys - attended school under Taliban rule. Now, roughly six million do, including two million girls.

But many conservative families still keep girls at home.

Kandahar province's 232 schools serve 110,000 students but only 26,000 are girls, the governor said. There are just 10 schools solely for girls, Raufi added.

Arsonists have repeatedly attacked girls schools across the country. Attackers burned down a girls' school in the northwestern province Faryab on Sunday, said Gen. Kalil Andrabi, the provincial police chief.

Gunmen even killed two students outside a girls' school in central Logar province in 2007, one of 236 attacks involving Afghan schools UNICEF recorded that year.

The Afghan government has also accused the Taliban of attacking schools in an attempt to force teenage boys to join the Islamic militia.

In other developments, the U.S. military said Tuesday its troops killed six militants and detained 12 others in two operations in eastern Afghanistan on Monday. The operations targeted militants associated with Gulbuddin Hekmatyar and Jalaludin Haqqani, the statement said.

Afghanistan's intelligence agency said it arrested four people, including three religious leaders and a youth, for alleged involvement in suicide and other bomb attacks in northern Kunduz province. The ring was tracked down after a failed attack earlier this year, when the would-be bomber failed to properly detonate his explosives, the agency said.
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Offline geo

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From a personal perspective, I say that, if they are found to be guilty.... Spray their faces with acid - blind them and release them into the general public to fend for themselves - as they intended for their victims

An eye for an eye,
A tooth for a tooth........
Chimo!

jollyjacktar

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From a personal perspective, I say that, if they are found to be guilty.... Spray their faces with acid - blind them and release them into the general public to fend for themselves - as they intended for their victims

An eye for an eye,
A tooth for a tooth........
hear hear.  but only after "due process" of course.....

Offline geo

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Of course
Chimo!

jollyjacktar

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would hate to offend the whingers that may be in the audience...

Offline Inky

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The afghan people will do what they wish with them and being culturally sensitive, I know I will not be dissatisfied with the sentence, should the accused be found guilty. >:D

Offline ENGINEERS WIFE

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Iranian court sentences man to be blinded by acid
Updated Thu. Nov. 27 2008 7:52 AM ET

The Associated Press

TEHRAN, Iran -- Iranian newspapers say a court has sentenced a man who blinded a woman with acid also to be blinded with acid under the country's Islamic law.

Thursday's reports in several newspapers, including the Kargozaran, say 27-year-old Majid confessed to attacking Ameneh Bahrami in 2004 to dissuade anyone from marrying the woman he loved.

Wednesday's ruling was issued based on the Islamic law system of "qisas," or eye for an eye retribution.

The reports say Ameneh asked the court to sentence Majid, who was only identified by his first name, to be blinded by acid to prevent similar attacks on other women. Majid is allowed to appeal the verdict.

http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/20081127/iran_acid_081127/20081127?hub=World


I know that this is Iran and wasn't the same reasons for throwing the acid, but, I think he'll be recieving the punishment that most would want for the cowards in Afghanistan.



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Offline Hamish Seggie

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OK now the NDP will decry the punishment. I didn't hear too many complaints from the NDP and its mouthpiece when the attacks on the schoolkids took place.
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;D
OK now the NDP will decry the punishment. I didn't hear too many complaints from the NDP and its mouthpiece when the attacks on the schoolkids took place.

You got that right!  I bet the sound of all the feathers rustling as left wings beat mightily in indignation with whinging crys of protest will be deafening.

EW, you too are right on the money.  My wife lived many years under Islamic law and a military dictatorship.  She often said there would be things that would and could be done that I would approve of....  I guess she was right. 

Hope this thug loses his appeal.

Offline geo

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Heh.... something I can agree on.

The Ayatolah is a friend ???

Oh well -  the enemy of your enemy is ..... not so much an enemy - for the time being
Chimo!

Offline Jarnhamar

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What the frig is wrong with the Taliban?

Their throwing acid into the face of school girls? Who does that?

I'd throw my two cents in and suggest these douche bags get burned, hung, shot etc.. but that's right about the time that someone will make a reference to army.ca on a CTV website or something.

"Canadian soldiers want people tortured with acid!" Then comes out the S word.

I don't believe I'm saying it but lets not give the "Guess what I saw at army.ca!" idiots any ammo.
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Offline geo

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Let's face it, let the TB show themselves for what they are.
Let the people know how messed up they are & let them make an informed decision as to if and when they want to return to a government led by these animals.
Chimo!

Offline Yrys

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Afghan Schoolgirls Undeterred by Attack - NY Times
« Reply #62 on: January 14, 2009, 01:05:38 »
Afghan Schoolgirls Undeterred by Attack

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan — One morning two months ago, Shamsia Husseini and her sister
were walking through the muddy streets to the local girls school when a man pulled alongside
them on a motorcycle and posed what seemed like an ordinary question.

“Are you going to school?”

Then the man pulled Shamsia’s burqa from her head and sprayed her face with burning acid.
Scars, jagged and discolored, now spread across Shamsia’s eyelids and most of her left cheek.
These days, her vision goes blurry, making it hard for her to read.

But if the acid attack against Shamsia and 14 others — students and teachers — was meant to
 terrorize the girls into staying home, it appears to have completely failed.

Today, nearly all of the wounded girls are back at the Mirwais School for Girls, including even
Shamsia, whose face was so badly burned that she had to be sent abroad for treatment. Perhaps
even more remarkable, nearly every other female student in this deeply conservative community
has returned as well — about 1,300 in all.

“My parents told me to keep coming to school even if I am killed,” said Shamsia, 17, in a moment
after class. Shamsia’s mother, like nearly all of the adult women in the area, is unable to read or
write. “The people who did this to me don’t want women to be educated. They want us to be
stupid things.”

In the five years since the Mirwais School for Girls was built here by the Japanese government,
it appears to have set off something of a social revolution. Even as the Taliban tighten their
noose around Kandahar, the girls flock to the school each morning. Many of them walk more
than two miles from their mud-brick houses up in the hills.

The girls burst through the school’s walled compound, many of them flinging off head-to-toe
garments, bounding, cheering and laughing in ways that are inconceivable outside — for girls
and women of any age. Mirwais has no regular electricity, no running water, no paved streets.
Women are rarely seen, and only then while clad in burqas that make their bodies shapeless
and their faces invisible.

And so it was especially chilling on Nov. 12, when three pairs of men on motorcycles began
circling the school. One of the teams used a spray bottle, another a squirt gun, another a jar.
They hit 11 girls and 4 teachers in all; 6 went to the hospital. Shamsia fared the worst.

The attacks appeared to be the work of the Taliban, the fundamentalist movement that is
battling the government and the American-led coalition. Banning girls from school was one
of the most notorious symbols of the Taliban’s rule before they were ousted from power in
November 2001.

Building new schools and ensuring that children — and especially girls — attend has been
one of the main objectives of the government and the nations that have contributed to
Afghanistan’s reconstruction. Some of the students at the Mirwais school are in their late
teens and early 20s, attending school for the first time. Yet at the same time, in the guerrilla
war that has unfolded across southern and eastern Afghanistan, the Taliban have made
schools one of their special targets.

But exactly who was behind the acid attack is a mystery. The Taliban denied any part in it.
The police arrested eight men and, shortly after that, the Ministry of Interior released a video
showing two men confessing. One of them said he had been paid by an officer with the
Directorate for Inter-Services Intelligence, the Pakistani intelligence agency, to carry out
the attack. But at a news conference last week, Hamid Karzai, the Afghan president, said
there was no such Pakistani involvement.

One thing is certain: in the months before the attack, the Taliban had moved into the Mirwais
area and the rest of Kandahar’s outskirts. As they did, posters began appearing in local mosques.
“Don’t Let Your Daughters Go to School,” one of them said.

In the days after the attack, the Mirwais School for Girls stood empty; none of the parents would
let their daughters venture outside. That is when the headmaster, Mahmood Qadari, got to work.
After four days of staring at empty classrooms, Mr. Qadari called a meeting of the parents.
Hundreds came to the school — fathers and mothers — and Mr. Qadari implored them
to let their daughters return. After two weeks, a few returned.

So, Mr. Qadari, whose three daughters live abroad, including one in Virginia, enlisted the support
of the local government. The governor promised more police officers, a footbridge across a busy
nearby road and, most important, a bus. Mr. Qadari called another meeting and told the parents
that there was no longer any reason to hold their daughters back. “I told them, if you don’t send
your daughters to school, then the enemy wins,” Mr. Qadari said. “I told them not to give in to
darkness. Education is the way to improve our society.”

The adults of Mirwais did not need much persuading. Neither the bus nor the police nor the bridge
has materialized, but the girls started showing up anyway. Only a couple of dozen girls regularly
miss school now; three of them are girls who had been injured in the attack.

“I don’t want the girls sitting around and wasting their lives,” said Ghulam Sekhi, an uncle of
Shamsia and her sister, Atifa, age 14, who was also burned.

For all the uncertainty outside its walls, the Mirwais school brims with life. Its 40 classrooms are
so full that classes are held in four tents, donated by Unicef, in the courtyard. The Afghan Ministry
of Education is building a permanent building as well. The past several days at the school have been
given over to examinations. In one classroom, a geography class, a teacher posed a series of
questions while her students listened and wrote their answers on paper.

“What is the capital of Brazil?” the teacher, named Arja, asked, walking back and forth.
“Now, what are its major cities?”
“By how many times is America larger than Afghanistan?”

At a desk in the front row, Shamsia, the girl with the burned face, pondered the questions while cupping
a hand over her largest scar. She squinted down at the paper, rubbed her eyes, wrote something down.
Doctors have told Shamsia that her face may need plastic surgery if there is to be any chance of the scars
disappearing. It is a distant dream: Shamsia’s village does not even have regular electricity, and her father
is disabled.

After class, Shamsia blended in with the other girls, standing around, laughing and joking. She seemed
un-self-conscious about her disfigurement, until she began to recount her ordeal. “The people who did this,”
she said, “do not feel the pain of others.”
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Offline geo

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Re: Afghan Schoolgirls Undeterred by Attack - NY Times
« Reply #63 on: January 14, 2009, 08:44:44 »
Sorta puts things into perspective & makes you know that things ARE getting better.  We HAVE made an impact.
Chimo!

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Re: Afghan Schoolgirls Undeterred by Attack - NY Times
« Reply #64 on: January 14, 2009, 08:48:39 »
and this will shall save a country.
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Re: Afghan Schoolgirls Undeterred by Attack - NY Times
« Reply #65 on: January 14, 2009, 09:29:23 »
Fantastic story!  My hat goes off to all those girls and their parents.

This is the kind of news that warms the heart.  If I have one..

people standing up in defiance to the Talibs like this may inspire others.  Shame with this Being good news that I expect the MSM will ignore it.

Offline Yrys

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Re: Afghan Schoolgirls Undeterred by Attack - NY Times
« Reply #66 on: January 14, 2009, 12:03:01 »
Shame with this Being good news that I expect the MSM will ignore it.

For me, the New York Times that published it is big enough to be MSM ...
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jollyjacktar

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Re: Afghan Schoolgirls Undeterred by Attack - NY Times
« Reply #67 on: January 14, 2009, 16:01:01 »
For me, the New York Times that published it is big enough to be MSM ...

I will freely admit to not paying attention to your MSM source of info.  However I am not so concerned with foreign MSM but our domestic bunch.  They do seem to abhor good news from there.  But I also freely admit my bias too.

Offline Dog Walker

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Here is a follow up to this story.

The girls are back in school. They are certainly showing a lot more character, strength, and guts, then the cowards of the Taliban. Hats off to them and let’s hope that they have a bright and happy future. They deserve it!  :salute:

Full article on link
http://www.iht.com/articles/2009/01/13/asia/kandahar.php


Quote
Afghan girls brave terror to return to school
By Dexter Filkins  Published: January 14, 2009

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan: One morning two months ago, Shamsia Husseini and her sister were walking through the muddy streets to the local girls' school when a man pulled alongside on a motorcycle and posed what seemed like an ordinary question.
"Are you going to school?" Then the man pulled Shamsia's burqa from her head and sprayed her face with burning acid. Scars, jagged and discolored, are now spread across Shamsia's eyelids and most of her left cheek. These days, her vision goes blurry, making it hard to read.
But if the acid attacks against Shamsia and 14 other students and teachers, which carried the tell-tale marks of the Taliban, were meant to terrorize the girls into staying home, they appear to have failed completely.
Today, nearly all of the wounded girls are back at the Mirwais School for Girls, including Shamsia, whose face was so badly burnt that she had to be sent abroad for treatment. Perhaps even more remarkable, nearly every other female student in this deeply conservative community has returned as well - about 1,300 in all.



Offline PMedMoe

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Maybe this topic should be merged with this one.
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Offline Yrys

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Maybe this topic should be merged with this one.

I've suggest it today, but there is not a lot of DS on line, so they may be busy somewhere else...
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Sorry to revive an almost-necro-post, but I can't decide whether to be sad or pissed here - only JUST spotted this, from CanWest (yeah, a month old, I'm off my game, but better late than never):
Quote
.... Last fall, Shamsia (Husseini), 17, was attacked along with a dozen other students and teachers at Mirwais Mena Girls' School in Kandahar, by men believed to be Taliban.

Her ordeal was made known in media ranging from Al-Jazeera to the New York Times, and Shamsia became an emblem of Taliban misogyny.

She also stood for courage in the face of grave danger, refusing to be intimidated. She told the Times, "My parents told me to keep coming to school even if I am killed. The people who did this to me don't want women to be educated. They want us to be stupid things." But this month, in an interview with Al-Jazeera at a secret location in Kabul, Shamsia Husseini said she had been attacked a second time and this time she and her family fled Kandahar, traditionally a Taliban stronghold ....

 >:(
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Offline geo

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Since we arrived in Afghanistan, we have taken many steps forward.
We should not be surprised if we are stuck taking many steps back....

Regardless of how far we though we had advanced, Afghanistan is still a backwards country that will need to claw it's way out of the dark ages over time.
Chimo!

Offline GAP

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People, those that were around, need to remember what life in some parts of Canada was like just 25-30 years ago....not quite as barbaric, but a helluva lot different that what exists today.....well, maybe not. I worked in a Northern Community where male abuse was commonplace and people just shrugged it off....I doubt it has changed much.
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http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/World/2009/05/11/9423076-ap.html
 Mass poisoning feared among Afghan schoolgirls
By Heidi Vogt, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHARIKAR, Afghanistan - Doctors are investigating whether dozens of students have been poisoned at a high school in northern Afghanistan after 61 girls went to the hospital complaining of sudden illness.
Dr. Khalil Farangi said Monday the 61 students and one teacher from Hora Jalaly high school in Parwan province northwest of Kabul complained of symptoms like irritability, weeping and confusion.
Several girls passed out.

The mass hospitalization comes about two weeks after a similar incident in Parwan, where dozens of girls were hospitalized after being sickened by what Afghan officials said were strong fumes or a possible poison gas cloud.
The Taliban and other conservative extremist groups in Afghanistan oppose education for girls, who were not allowed to attend school under the 1996-2001 Taliban regime.

Though it was unclear if Monday's incident was the result of an attack, militants in the south have previously assaulted schoolgirls by spraying acid in their faces and burned down schools as a protest against the government.   
Scores of Afghan schools have been forced to close because of violence.

Farangi, the director of Charikar's hospital, said officials sent blood samples to Kabul and to the main U.S. military base in Bagram to test whether some form of poison was to blame.
Provincial Gov. Abdul Basir Salangi an investigation is underway.

A number of students interviewed at the hospital complained of a strong sweet smell, which gave them headaches and made some girls wobbly before they passed out.
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