Author Topic: MERX WATCH: Dealing with Effects of IED Blast  (Read 3752 times)

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MERX WATCH: Dealing with Effects of IED Blast
« on: November 03, 2008, 09:46:26 »
MERX posting - .pdf attached if link doesn't work.

Quote
.... Blast injuries are one of the causes of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in military personnel returning from combat. Blasts effects due to IEDs as a cause of brain damage that may be diagnosed as TBI or mild-TBI (mTBI) remains controversial.  Evidence for pure blast energy brain damage in the absence of other significant injuries is not strong. Therefore, a better understanding of the physical effects induced by IEDs through numerical modeling, simulations and experimental investigations would facilitate their correlation with pathological findings and clinical diagnostics. It is anticipated that this may lead into a better understanding of primary blast injuries in order to develop better means of blast mitigation strategies ....

More on link
« Last Edit: November 03, 2008, 20:58:39 by milnews.ca »
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Re: MERX WATCH: Dealing with Effects of IED Blast
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2008, 20:54:35 »
You read it here @ Army.ca first, but here's MSM's catch up, shared in accordance with the "fair dealing" provisions, Section 29, of the Copyright Act.

Blast injuries probed
KATHLEEN HARRIS, NATIONAL BUREAU CHIEF, SUN MEDIA, 4 Nov 08
Article link

National Defence is grappling to better understand the new phenomenon of "blast injuries" suffered by soldiers in Afghanistan.

DND issued a tender yesterday for a $150,000 study on traumatic brain injuries caused by jolts and blows to the head from improvised explosive devices (IEDs) -- roadside bombs planted by the enemy.

The U.S. and U.K. have already launched studies and examined diagnosis and treatment programs for troops exposed to high-velocity explosions in Iraq and Afghanistan, known to cause symptoms ranging from moodiness and memory loss to depression, anxiety and even violence.

According to the notice from DND, brain injury diagnosis from blast effects "remains controversial."

"Evidence for pure blast injuries is not strong," it reads. "Therefore, a better understanding would facilitate their correlation and pathological findings and diagnostics."


“The risk of insult is the price of clarity.” -- Roy H. Williams

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Offline Greymatters

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Re: MERX WATCH: Dealing with Effects of IED Blast
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2008, 21:17:19 »
So, apparently the US and UK studies are meaningless when it comes to assessing and evaluating TBI injuries and their effects...

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: MERX WATCH: Dealing with Effects of IED Blast
« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2008, 23:20:14 »
Lots of previous work seems to have been done on this subject. I wonder why we need to reinvent this particular wheel? Example:

Because of exposure to traumatic events, the loss of health and independence, and bodily disfigurement that blast cases may encounter, these cases are at risk for a host of psychiatric disorders, including Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Many PTSC symptoms overlap with symptoms of TBI, especially mild brain injury: headache, dizziness, irritability, decreased concentration, memory problems, fatigue, visual disturbances, sensitivity to light and noise, judgment problems, anxiety, and depression. Similarities in the behavioral characteristics of patients with TBI and/or PTSD can complicate the rehabilitation team's diagnostic assessment effort.

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Offline Rider Pride

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Re: MERX WATCH: Dealing with Effects of IED Blast
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2008, 23:20:49 »
So, apparently the US and UK studies are meaningless when it comes to assessing and evaluating TBI injuries and their effects...

This is not a case of "instead of" but "in addition to". Those studies have not concluded yet.
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