Author Topic: CBC Writer Tries The Usual Stunts - But Lets Give Him The Afghan Offer!  (Read 7906 times)

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Offline 54/102 CEF

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CBC Writer John Gray has a piece on the deployment

Quality of writing (I don't think it can be called reporting) is for you to decide - call it as you see it - so here's a few comments from me - see the pics

DND can put the mark on all these jokers -

"Dear Esteemed Member of the Press

We've noted your interest in things military per your article and would like to invite you to embed with the unit that's currently on deployment.

We're sure it will round out your experience with DND and add to your journalistic talents or lack thereof"

See link http://www.cbc.ca/news/background/realitycheck/20060605gray.html

See images below
« Last Edit: June 05, 2006, 16:34:15 by 54/102 CEF »
You can visit me when I retire to the Island of Sayonara - but if the tide goes out - you go too - OK?

Offline yoman

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Quote
They are in harm's way all the time, and they have little idea what to do except to do what the Americans tell them to do.

Best part of the article.  ::)
"Patience and perseverance have a magical effect before which difficulties disappear and obstacles vanish." John Quincy Adams

Offline kilekaldar

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"our soldiers know little enough of where they are and most of them probably care less"

EXCUSE ME? I can only speak for myself, but I most definetly know and care about where I'm going in two months, and by the sounds of this article I've probably done more research on Afghanistan than this hack.

At our unit we've have multiple briefs about the country, it's culture, history and the dangers to expect. From what I could tell everyone found it very usefull and interesting. We also have a library of freshly bought books on A'stan that was rapidly emptied by various interested soldiers.

This hack is making up stuff as he goes. After 20 years in his line of work it's time he stopped inflicting himself on unsuspecting readers and retire.

Offline Zarathustra

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Best part of the article.  ::)

*lol* I was going to quote this part too. And the author starts his article by quoting the New York Times.

"The more I practice the luckier I get."

Offline HDE

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John Gray is the Globe's "reality check" guy.  Sort of a general-purpose "expert" on pretty much everthing ::) 
« Last Edit: June 06, 2006, 08:31:17 by old medic »

Offline medicineman

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I'm willing to bet he'd find a way to weasel out of any invites to be embedded with anyone except his mistress...

MM
MM

Remember the basics of Medicine - "Pink is GOOD, Blue is BAD, Air goes in AND out, Blood Goes Round and Round"

I may sound like a pessimist, but I am a realist.

Offline NewCenturion

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Is it just me? I get worn out reading this crap, I used to bang off a letter to the editor, but it's like casting pearls before swine.  The CBC "Reality Check" is "reality" viewed thru the lenses of Liberal red/ NDP orange colored glasses.
« Last Edit: June 06, 2006, 08:32:22 by old medic »
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Offline big bad john (John Hill)

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My opinion of the CBC fell drastically this week when I watched the correspondants question period.  But then again I was raised on BBC, and they are a little bit left themselves.

Offline van Gemeren

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The CBC changed the format of its website, maybe they mean that those authors need a reality check that they feature. :blotto:
"It's tough being paranoid and having someone out to get you"
-Journeyman
http://forums.army.ca/forums/index.php/topic,59309.msg555623.html#msg555623

Offline pbi

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Glad you guys picked up on this piece of ill-informed, slanted rubbish. I read it today and nearly chucked. I see hardly any "facts" in his piece, but I do see alot of broad generalization, speculation and stereotyping. Tellingly, I also see no reference to any time he has spent in Afgh.

It seems to me that people like Gray cannot grasp the idea that Canadian soldiers might actually be well-informed (at least, far better informed than the average Canadian), that they might know what they are doing in Afgh and why, and that under the OEF command arrangement in Afgh they are not "taking orders" from the Americans because Canada does not give command of its toops to other countries, and has not since at least WWI.

More handwringing about the sky falling.  I think these people desperately want our mision to fail, so that the Tories, the military, the CDS and (of course) the US are all discredited.

Cheers
« Last Edit: June 06, 2006, 09:43:24 by pbi »
The Nation that makes a great distinction between its scholars and its warriors will have its thinking done by cowards and its fighting done by fools. ...

The true measure of a man is what he would do if he knew he never would be found out...

Offline pbi

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Here is some more nonsense in the Globe and Mail by Lawrence Martin, whose journalistic skills have been reviewed elsewhere on these pages (and slammed by Christie Blatchford). You can find this at: http://www.theglobeandmail.com//servlet/story/LAC.20060606.COMARTIN06/TPStory/specialComment/columnists.

Quote
The fear card has been dealt -- and Harper will play it
 
LAWRENCE MARTIN

E-mail Lawrence Martin | Read Bio | Latest Columns
The uncovering of the alleged terrorist plot is a hair-raising alert for Canadians that will create new stresses in our multicultural fabric and ratchet up support for the law-and-order conservatism of Stephen Harper.

There will be less regard for civil rights, more regard for excessive security, and quite possibly, a hardening of the appetite for the war in Afghanistan.

Events like this make it easy for political leaders to mobilize citizen anxiety. Mr. Harper has been handed a golden gift for a politician of the right -- the fear card. He is very likely to play it.

The liberally inclined were reluctant to believe we were high on the list of terror targets. That reluctance is now removed. The country of soft hearts will tilt in harder directions.

In our foreign policy, a shift had been under way since the Conservatives came to power. Ammonium nitrate will hasten the change and could very well seal the new deal. Before Mr. Harper's arrival, owing chiefly to our position on the Iraq war, we were situated in the moderate middle, playing our traditional, honest-broker, multilateral role. We were separated from the hard-line lean of the Anglo axis -- the United States, Britain and Australia. Because the war had gone so badly, it was an honourable separation. And because the Bush administration had become so widely discredited, all the more so.

But no longer. Mr. Harper never viewed our position as being quite so admirable. He wants full membership in the axis of Anglos -- and will likely get it.

Judging from his pronouncements when the Iraq war began, it is clear he favoured our participation. Public opinion subsequently curbed some of his hawkishness and during the election campaign, he came off as mellow-minded, steering well adrift of Bushian inclinations.

In power, he's felt free enough to brandish some of his ideology. He brought the Afghan war to the forefront, while leaving Darfur and Haiti to the side. He took the hard line on Hamas and the Tamil Tigers and junked Kyoto. He, wisely, gave a big budget boost to the RCMP and took other anti-crime measures. He brought Australian Prime Minister John Howard to Ottawa and his Tories cheered the Aussie mightily when he gave a full-scale endorsement of the ways of the U.S.

Having come this far, the Prime Minister can now go farther. Public support in this country for the war on terror will likely rise, giving him enough leeway to put himself firmly in league with the tough guys.

We've heard his "cut and run" jargon. Now there will be additions. Lines like, "Our freedoms are at risk" and "Our very way of life is under threat." They will be the rallying cries any time the government wants more support for policing, for security, for wars.

The beauty of it politically is that no one will be able to say with certainty that Mr. Harper is wrong because no one can predict with certainty that there won't be an attack. There have been no terror outbreaks in the U.S. since 9/11 but it hasn't stopped Mr. Bush from playing the fear card regularly and with good effect.

From Afghanistan, the news for Mr. Harper has been worrisome. Evidence accumulates to the effect that the war may well be unwinnable, at least in terms of dispelling the Taliban. But there will be little appetite for any rethink now, not with terror at our own door.

It's not only the Conservatives who will benefit from the news of the weekend but to look to the Liberals is to see that the leading candidate in the leadership race is the more militant Michael Ignatieff. His stock stood to go down as did Mr. Harper's if the Afghanistan adventure turned ugly.

But ammonium nitrate in our midst is balm for him as well. Its discovery, thanks to the great work of the RCMP and CSIS, was good news. But the portents that come with it -- do we really want charter membership in the Anglo club? -- give pause.

When the fear card is dealt to those in power, the chances of overreaction appreciably augment. The tragic Iraq adventure is but one example. How many new terrorists have been spawned as a result of the deaths of thousands of innocents there can only be guessed.

That's what can happen when the card is in play. The cure can become worse than the disease itself.

lawrencemartin9@yahoo.ca


Of course: this was all dreamed up by the RCMP and the CF to boost support for the troops in Afghanistan, right?  Talk about "fear-mongering": isn't that exactly what Martin is indulging in?

Quote
He brought the Afghan war to the forefront, while leaving Darfur and Haiti to the side.

What? Who deployed Canadian soldiers as part of OEF  in 2002 and again in 2006 ? The Tories? Who withdrew our military from Haiti? Harper? Who initiated the approach to focus on Afghanistan and avoid Darfur (except to send Grizzlies?) The Tories?

This historical distortion seems to be SOP with people of this persuasion, whether they are scribbling in the Globe, posting on some lefty blog, or ranting down at the Student Union.

The Globe does itself no service by publish this kind of drivel.

Cheers




The Nation that makes a great distinction between its scholars and its warriors will have its thinking done by cowards and its fighting done by fools. ...

The true measure of a man is what he would do if he knew he never would be found out...

Offline Chris Pook

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I am trying to remember the title of a documentary on the Media coverage of Campaign 2004. The one before last.

I have a lasting memory of three of the nation's premier (where IS that sarcasm emoticon?) journalists standing outside one of Harper's buses poring over their blackberries in the final days of the campaign.

The three reporters were from different papers: the Star, the Globe and somebody else.  I forget who the other reporters were but I distinctly remember Lawrence Martin.

It was the "child pornography" issue that had come up - some overheated press release - and Harper had commented.  Martin asked "What can we say about that?"  The other reporters were inclined to say that Harper had defused the issue.  Martin rejoinded with "Well, we can say that he didn't deny it......." and then proceeded to set the story line for the next day's papers, not just his own.

I may be off on the details but I remember the exchange so vividly because it encapsulated for me everything that was wrong about the Canadian media in general and the Parliamentary Press Gallery in particular.

While many of them can convince themselves they are not Liberal, they revel in the notion that they are liberal and not conservative.
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Offline 54/102 CEF

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John Gray seems to have good days and bad days http://www.cbc.ca/news/background/realitycheck/
You can visit me when I retire to the Island of Sayonara - but if the tide goes out - you go too - OK?

Offline Mike Bobbitt

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We have to remember that journalists write what sells, and what sells to the majority of Canadians these days is getting Canada back to it's roots of social programs and a military that is to be seen (and not heard) only as international heroes in blue helmets. War is a terribly unsavoury topic, and journalists can easily capitalize on the fact that a sadly large number of Canadians don't consider our presence in Afghanistan a solution to anything.

Facts are not required to spin a "feel good" yarn about how we can (and should) blame the Tories for our unlawful invasion of an otherwise peaceful nation. In order for that story to work, our soldiers (poor brainwashed souls that they are) must not have the wherewithal to think for themselves, let alone understand the political, economical or cultural background of the job they are doing.

Don't blame the journalist for making a living writing what sells. Blame the readers who are willing to pay for it.

Offline MarkOttawa

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Three months and a bit into the mission and it's hopeless.  The headline and subheads:

    "Canadians in Afghanistan, where the news is never good

    The descent into anarchy

    Is it a war that is doomed to be lost?"

And the Globe knows it's a quagmire already.
http://toyoufromfailinghands.blogspot.com/2006/06/afstan-globes-agenda-secret-no-more.html

Mark
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Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Offline Infanteer

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Good grief - the only reason Afghanistan is a quagmire is because the press has turned it into one.  Until we get the equivelent of a Col David Hackworth saying "This war is no good", I think these reporters should spare us the doom and gloom....
"Overall it appears that much of the apparent complexity of modern war stems in practice from the self-imposed complexity of modern HQs" LCol J.P. Storr

Offline 54/102 CEF

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Don't blame the journalist for making a living writing what sells. Blame the readers who are willing to pay for it.

Best summary of how to fight them. Thanks Mike!
You can visit me when I retire to the Island of Sayonara - but if the tide goes out - you go too - OK?