Author Topic: Do I have to be good at math to be a pilot?  (Read 26804 times)

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Offline SupersonicMax

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Re: Do I have to be good at math to be a pilot?
« Reply #25 on: August 21, 2012, 09:42:33 »
If you have learning disabilities, you'll have a hard time.  Being a pilot in the CF is all about how fast you can learn new things, both academically and practically. 

As far as math goes, it's important (just like any science type class), as a concept.  You don't necessarily put it into practice everyday, but you use physics and maths concepts every single day.

Offline Habs

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Re: Do I have to be good at math to be a pilot?
« Reply #26 on: August 21, 2012, 10:26:56 »
Yeah, I've done some researching on the CFAT on this site, and I'm just looking over thread after thread about CFAT.

I suggest you don't do that too much. It'll only make you worried and make the CFAT seem like some impassable test. That's what happened to me anyway.

It is not very hard. It is not very easy. The time given seems like a lot, but it really isn't once you start answering questions. You'll probably end up guessing on a few. And that reminds me! Never leave a question blank, if you don't know the answer, just guess! Don't spend 3 minutes on one question, that's what killed me on a couple.

Anyway, just review grade 8/9/10 high school math/English and you should be fine. I went on math sites and printed off sheets, answered the questions, then checked my answers. Seemed to help a lot.

Offline Journeyman

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Re: Do I have to be good at math to be a pilot?
« Reply #27 on: August 21, 2012, 11:17:33 »
OK, the main reason I avoid Recruiting threads is that my loving, caring advice is sometimes taken as.....well, harsh -- but I'll try again; maybe it'll help if you read it aloud in your favourite grandmother's voice.

The original poster has a learning disability exacerbated by anxiety issues when under pressure....so now the "helpful advice" is trying to coddle him through the CFAT! Seriously?! I'm sure once past that gruelling CFAT hurdle, flight training will be a piece of cake.   ::)

Go back and read the posts by SupersonicMax, Dimsum, and CDN Aviator. They're in this business, (unlike those who are obviously not aircrew, if they're in the CF at all); they are trying to tell you that flying within the CF is not in your future.

Here, have a cookie. [Loving grandma voice ends]



Once again, we see "opinions" and "useful, informed opinions"  :not-again:

Offline Loachman

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Re: Do I have to be good at math to be a pilot?
« Reply #28 on: August 21, 2012, 12:12:25 »
Achieving Wings is not in many people's future.

While I was going through Pilot training, we were told that only one in eight hundred applicants was successful.

CFAT is only one minor step at the beginning of the whole process. It is the least of your worries.

Aircrew Selection strips out a lot of people that score high enough on CFAT.

The first flying course strips out people that made it past Aircrew Selection, and each successive flying course strips out people that made it through the preceding one.

The hardest that I have ever worked was my first month in Moose Jaw on the Tutor course. That month was all ground school. I studied in the morning during breakfast. I studied during lunch. I studied from the moment that I got home at the end of each day until I went to bed, save a twenty-minute dinner break. On Friday nights I got drunk at the Officers' Mess like everybody else, did all of my personal stuff on Saturday plus some studying, and then studied all day on Sunday.

The following nine months required slightly less effort, but the ability to slack off was minimal.

It takes a lot of work to absorb the amount of absolutely essential knowledge that is being force-fed, even without learning disabilities. A lot. If one cannot keep up, one is not going to pass, and there is no extra time to be found.

If tests are a problem now, they will be a much bigger problem on flying courses. Several written tests on my Tutor course had pass marks of 90%. There are flying tests at the end of every phase on every course. I saw coursemates fail because they had tendencies to freeze under the perceived pressure of flying tests even though they were solid performers during regular training trips.

In practice, every flight is a test of sorts. If you do not understand every aspect of a flight in the briefing room before you walk out, you can expect the trip to be cancelled. It does not take many such cancellations before one is removed from the course. Similarly, failure to achieve the performance levels required during each flight will result in training being ceased pretty quickly.

Yes, you could be one of the 0.125% of Pilot applicants who succeeds. You'll not know until you try. Be prepared for disappointment, however.


Offline Tape

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Re: Do I have to be good at math to be a pilot?
« Reply #29 on: August 21, 2012, 19:20:16 »
Achieving Wings is not in many people's future.

While I was going through Pilot training, we were told that only one in eight hundred applicants was successful.

CFAT is only one minor step at the beginning of the whole process. It is the least of your worries.

Aircrew Selection strips out a lot of people that score high enough on CFAT.

The first flying course strips out people that made it past Aircrew Selection, and each successive flying course strips out people that made it through the preceding one.

The hardest that I have ever worked was my first month in Moose Jaw on the Tutor course. That month was all ground school. I studied in the morning during breakfast. I studied during lunch. I studied from the moment that I got home at the end of each day until I went to bed, save a twenty-minute dinner break. On Friday nights I got drunk at the Officers' Mess like everybody else, did all of my personal stuff on Saturday plus some studying, and then studied all day on Sunday.

The following nine months required slightly less effort, but the ability to slack off was minimal.

It takes a lot of work to absorb the amount of absolutely essential knowledge that is being force-fed, even without learning disabilities. A lot. If one cannot keep up, one is not going to pass, and there is no extra time to be found.

If tests are a problem now, they will be a much bigger problem on flying courses. Several written tests on my Tutor course had pass marks of 90%. There are flying tests at the end of every phase on every course. I saw coursemates fail because they had tendencies to freeze under the perceived pressure of flying tests even though they were solid performers during regular training trips.

In practice, every flight is a test of sorts. If you do not understand every aspect of a flight in the briefing room before you walk out, you can expect the trip to be cancelled. It does not take many such cancellations before one is removed from the course. Similarly, failure to achieve the performance levels required during each flight will result in training being ceased pretty quickly.

Yes, you could be one of the 0.125% of Pilot applicants who succeeds. You'll not know until you try. Be prepared for disappointment, however.

Thanks for taking your time to write this. I will still continue with my plans, and hope for the best, as you said, I won't know until I try.